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20121101
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Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
sommer, tell us what that's about. it's a mystery to a lot of people. >> it sounds kind of wonky. but what it is, it's the most aggressive climate change policy in the country. this goes back to six years ago when governor arnold schwarzenegger passed the landmark global warming law in the state. it has a huge goal which is to cut the greenhouse gas emissions 30% by 2020. >> why don't we give schwarzenegger the credit for that? he didn't pass it. the legislature. >> we'll give him that credit. but it's a huge feat. there's a number of programs, but it started with cap and trade. it applies to oil refineries, manufacturers, food processors. >> polluters. so you brought some props with you. >> i brought some props. >> we're going to show how cap and trade works. so let's bring out the props. and try to figure out, how do you cut pollution in a state where there's a lot of industry, and a lot of oil refineries, and cement companies. what have you got here? >> first of all, let's start with the cap part of cap and trade. this is an overall limit on the greenhouse gases that can be em
in chicago on tuesday night. tell us what was it like. were people surprised at the close, the short drama? >> well, you know, belva, we were in the snoechs the snoeno hampshire, you know how dramatic it was all the way through. just amazing to be there on that final night. this was a much different election night than 2008, when 250,000 people greeted this sort of landmark moment. barack obama is more weathered, he's -- >> belva: graying. >> graying, but boy, the -- the democrats there, it was just pandemonium. and i think -- this time, it was tears of relief. instead of joy. that this contest has been so tough, so expensive and so important in so many ways and we saw it so negative that i think people are glad it's over, but to be there and to watch the president give that address and we heard him today in washington talking about what happens now in this country. i think the republicans learned from this election, what we saw in this election, we've seen in california decades before. the ethnic vote, the latino vote, the youth vote, the women's vote. this is -- this has been an elector
proposition 30. tell us what the judge decided. >> well, a judge decided that mysterious arizona group needed to disclose its donors or disclose them to the state. the group appealed. the disclose sure is still tied up, as we speak. the disclosure hasn't happened. and the state and the attorney general and the fair political practice commission has asked the state supreme court to make the group give them the document so they can examine it to see if they have to disclose the doe mores. all of this is happening right before the election and whether to be seen. it's $11 million, a lot of money, until you kind of back up and look at the larger macro-focus here. the map light foundation, which tracks campaign money, both in california and other parts of the country, came out with a number recently that they calculate $350 million on ballot measures alone this general election season in california, remember that doesn't include legislative congressional, anything else. 350 many ballot measures. prop 30, prop 32, this union paycheck protection measure and prop 37, in particular. about food labelin
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)